fuck yeah, jane austen.

A daily blog devoted to the novels, films, and all things Austen

(Source: unreasonablyme)

waiting-for-autumn:

Northanger Abbey

waiting-for-autumn:

Northanger Abbey

jeely:

jeely’s favorite movies (in no particular order) 

Mansfield Park (1999)

dangerdtm:

I do love me some “Pride and Prejudice.” I also love it summarized and analyzed in these terms. Seriously, what’s not to like?

whatwouldelizabethbennetdo:

our life holds few distinctions, Mrs Bennet, but I think we may safely boast that here sit two of the silliest girls in the country

(Source: vakarrrian)

(Source: darcyknightley)

thatwetshirt:

Every sacrifice has been made, however painful.

erikkwakkel:

A snippet Jane Austen: how medieval!
A rare paper snippet in Jane Austen’s handwriting was discovered. Written in 1814, it contains highlights from a sermon held by her brother. Reading the news I was struck by the parallel with similar finds from the Middle Ages. For one thing, in both cases such discoveries raise more questions than they answer. Was there originally more than this? Why did Austen (and her medieval peers) create the tiny note? Why did it lay dormant for so long? The most intriguing question (and parallel) is related to what is actually hidden from view. While the front of the Austen-fragment can be read, the back cannot, because the snippet is pasted onto a larger sheet. Experts are trying to separate the two, hoping to double their understanding. This is as medieval as can be. Strips from medieval books, after all, are frequently found pasted - recycled - on bookbindings. These fragments also provide a tantalizing, albeit one-sided view at a discovered written object from the past.
Read more in this Guardian article, which is also the source of the image. More about medieval snippets pasted onto bookbindings in this post I wrote a while back.

erikkwakkel:

A snippet Jane Austen: how medieval!

A rare paper snippet in Jane Austen’s handwriting was discovered. Written in 1814, it contains highlights from a sermon held by her brother. Reading the news I was struck by the parallel with similar finds from the Middle Ages. For one thing, in both cases such discoveries raise more questions than they answer. Was there originally more than this? Why did Austen (and her medieval peers) create the tiny note? Why did it lay dormant for so long? The most intriguing question (and parallel) is related to what is actually hidden from view. While the front of the Austen-fragment can be read, the back cannot, because the snippet is pasted onto a larger sheet. Experts are trying to separate the two, hoping to double their understanding. This is as medieval as can be. Strips from medieval books, after all, are frequently found pasted - recycled - on bookbindings. These fragments also provide a tantalizing, albeit one-sided view at a discovered written object from the past.

Read more in this Guardian article, which is also the source of the image. More about medieval snippets pasted onto bookbindings in this post I wrote a while back.

(via theotherausten)

realisticallyoptimisticpessimist:

JanTerm doodles in my Jane Austen class.

realisticallyoptimisticpessimist:

JanTerm doodles in my Jane Austen class.